Conservation History

Invasive Species Control History

Invasive Species Control History

Updated: January 2013 Invasive nonnative plant species have existed in the Park since before its establishment in 1971.  Ring counts of English ivy stems cut on trees in the year 2000 were as high as 35 years.  The earliest known attempts at control focussed on the ivy, the most visible and pervasive of the many nonnative species.  In those days it was also the largest known threat to the ecosystem of the Park. Elinor Levin started removing ivy occasionally in 1983, and more often starting in 1988.  During her first few years of this effort,...

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Invasive Species Control Status by Plant Grouping

Invasive Species Control Status by Plant Grouping

Updated: January 2013 By the end of 2012 the status of control efforts was as follows: Ground ivy:  Less than 5% of the Park only slightly infested and untended, with an additional 35% of the Park initially controlled (pulled at least once).  Ivy in almost all locations visible from the upper loop trails near the Nature Center, and on the east side of the Creek from Red Fox Bridge almost to 4th Avenue, has been pulled at least once, and much of that area more than once.  A similar effort has occurred on the west side of the Creek between...

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Trail Maintenance History

Trail Maintenance History

Tryon Creek State Natural Area As of January 2012 Most of the seven miles of hiking trails and four miles of equestrian trails in the Park were completed within a few years of creation of the Park in 1971, with most work done by volunteers. The Friends sponsored “Trail Days” on a weekend in April of 1973. Friends’ Board member Jean Siddall flagged trails and recruited leaders to supervise this major trail-building effort. Several miles of trail were cleared and graded, including the current loops near the Nature Center. So they could...

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